Lt Hugh Barr Miller, Jr. US Navy

Twice nominated for the Medal of Honor; awarded The Navy Cross, 2 Purple Hearts, Meritorious Service Medal; The Navy Cross  in lieu of 2 Silver Stars, 6 Bronze Stars, all along with numerous campaign Medals

One of the key items that Miller took with him when he escaped from Arundel Island was a silk banzai flag being carried by a Japanese Lieutenant that Miller killed with a bayonet in his first hand grenade attack. The Japanese Lieutenant was leading a patrol that got too close to Miller's hideout on Arundel Island.​ The flag remains with Miller's family. Miller later returned the valuable sword set of this Japanese Lieutenant to his family in Japan in recognition of the Japanese reformation.

Then Admiral Halsey (later promoted to Fleet Admiral, a 5 Star position only occupied by a few Officers of all US services in the history of the US), Eleanor Roosevelt, wife of President Roosevelt, and Miller in the middle at the first of several medal ceremonies for Lt. Hugh Barr Miller, Jr. – The Navy’s One Man Army 

Other publications

also tell much shortened versions of this story. Like the "100 Best True Stories of World War Two"; where Miller’s story is entitled “The Castaway on Arundel Island, p. 219-225, or "Into the Shadows Furious: the Brutal Battle for New Georgia" starting on pages 123-124 and completing on pages 128-135; and the many comics books of the 1940’s, 50’s and early 1960’s like the 1963 Bluebook and Male magazine stories of his heroics. Extracts from several of the 1950's comic books about Miller's exploits are used to illustrate the book.

All of these not-so-original sources, the many comic book & other magazine versions of Miller’s story that continued to be published into the early 1960’s, persevere because they are truly “amazing but true” and inspire us all.​​

Added Biography Details

As reported in the Gadsden, AL newspaper, a second attempt was made by Adm. Halsey to award Miller the MOH. President Eisenhower signed the bill. It is still possible to complete the award process.

Lt. Miller didn't look like the type of man who had just completed one of the great exploits in US Military History. the book explains his background and why he was successful in attacking and surviving while so many others did not. the rest of his life is also summarized so that a complete appreciation of how "just an ordinary american" can perform under such stress is better understood

Why Miller has not yet received his Medal of Honor